Let's debunk some myths about led lighting

- Apr 29, 2019-

Fact: As with many new technologies, the first generations of LED lighting systems were costlier than traditional metal halide or high-pressure sodium alternatives. Upfront acquisition and installation costs have since fallen dramatically and LED retrofits or new installations can now be completed at competitive price points to those traditional systems. Moreover, LED lighting generates the same or better illumination with substantially lower power input. Upfront system costs are usually recovered very quickly from utility cost savings alone.

Fact: New LED bulbs and control systems give operators much more flexibility to alter the color temperature and color coordinated index (“CCI”) of LED illumination to tone down the perceived harshness that might have plagued earlier LED systems. Modern fixtures and lenses also help to disperse lighting and to reduce glare from brighter bulbs.

Fact: LED bulbs include more complex technology than incandescent or fluorescent fixtures. Quality LED manufacturers push that technology to produce better and longer-lasting products that incorporate features such as advanced thermal control and more stable electronics. Some  LED systems might cost less than others, but those lower-cost systems might not have the newest technology that creates improved lighting performance.

 Fact: LED’s last substantially longer than traditional lighting fixtures, but the will need to be replaced at some point. On average, LED bulbs will perform above a minimum illumination level for 50,000 hours. Many continue to generate light beyond this average lifespan, but their total light output will be lower than when they were first brought into service. Facilities that install LED lighting systems will continue to need to plan for maintenance and replacement, but those needs will be substantially reduced in comparison to traditional lighting.

Fact: Doctors’ groups did criticize early generations of LED light that had high concentrations of blue-wavelength lighting. Lighting in that wavelength tends to keep people alert and to interfere with circadian rhythms and sleep patterns. Newer LED systems have controls that allow operators to reduce blue wavelengths in favor of more calming orange or yellow lighting. Therefore the early criticisms are no longer as valid.